Category Archives: Working Process

‘5 Senses Collective’ Final Exhibition Weekend

This coming weekend, on the 25th and 26th of September, the ‘5 Senses Collective’ will be exhibiting a selection of their work at Plas Newydd Tea Garden: The Tea Garden will be open from 11AM to 6PM both days, with a delicious selection of coffees, teas, cakes and treats! A huge thanks to everyone who attended our first exhibition weekend on the 4th and 5th of September, who helped to make the exhibition such a success. This exhibition is running in conjunction with, and as a part of, the Clwydian Creatives Art Trail 2021 (also on Facebook).

The ‘5 Senses Collective’ combines a variety of different media, curated together in one beautiful space – set against the stunning backdrop of Moel Famau and the Clwydians. The Collective features:
Photography from James Biggs Photographyhttps://www.jamesbiggsphotography.com/
Fine art from Florence Bigglestonehttps://www.instagram.com/floss_art/
Abstract sculpture from Nick Eames, Sculptorhttps://nickeamessculptor.com/
Abstract painting from Liz Eames Arthttps://www.lizeamesart.com/
Contemporary poetry from Tim Johnson – Trash Poetry

Photos courtesy of Nick Eames and Mary Howley: Featuring Lucy Eames in the outdoor exhibition space, and Nick with ‘The Gull.’

We can be found at:
Plas Newydd, Cilcain, Mold CH7 5NZ

We hope to see you there! Bring an appetite. 😉 🍰 ☕️

Restoration of Spelter figures, with Ewan Stell: Part 2

The restoration of two mid 19th century Spelter figures: The Reaper (‘Left Handed Luke’) and The Sower (‘Nearly Headless Nick‘) continues, with Studio Assistant Ewan Stell.

The slideshow below details the process so far, with captions for each image explaining the stages of the restoration.

Stay tuned to see the next stage of the restoration process…

‘The Gull’ arrives at Plas Newydd Tea Gardens

‘The Gull,’ constructed in steel and wire mesh, has been transported to Plas Newydd Tea Gardens, where it will soon be completed in situ as part of the upcoming ‘5 Senses Collective’ Exhibition (held on the weekends of the 4th/5th and 25th/26th of September, 2021, as part of the Clwydian Creatives Art Trail – click here for their Facebook page).

Visitors to the Tea Gardens will be able to observe Nick working on ‘The Gull’ in its final stages. The piece will be permanently installed at Plas Newydd in late autumn, once the garden plants die back, and before the arrival of the Shepherd’s Hut.

The slideshow below shows Nick, James, and Lucy Eames preparing and transporting the gull, together with Studio Assistant Ewan Stell, James Bigglestone, and Luke Griffiths.

The ‘5 Senses Collective’ combines a variety of different media, curated together in one beautiful space – set against the stunning backdrop of Moel Famau and the Clwydians. The Collective features:

Photography from James Biggs Photographyhttps://www.jamesbiggsphotography.com/
Fine art from Florence Bigglestone – https://www.instagram.com/floss_art/
Abstract sculpture from Nick Eames, Sculptorhttps://nickeamessculptor.com/
Abstract painting from Liz Eames Arthttps://www.lizeamesart.com/
Contemporary poetry from Tim Johnson – Trash Poetry

The Exhibition will be held from 11am-6pm on the 4th, 5th, 25th and 26th of September at:

Plas Newydd,
Cilcain,
Mold,
CH7 5NZ

A delicious selection of cakes, coffees, and treats will be available at the Tea Gardens.

North Wales Magazine: ‘Sculpting the Future’ – Sonia Goulding interviews Nick Eames

The brilliant Sonia Goulding (of turningthestones.com, and recently featured in Acumen’s online guest poetry) has written this amazing article about Nick, his process, and the intentions behind his work, published in print with North Wales Magazine – they’ve done a beautiful job with the formatting and presentation of it, too!

The article can be found on page 11 of the August 2021 edition, so please support the magazine by picking up a copy. You can check out the pages here, but trust us, it’s even better in print (click on the images for a full preview).

Thank you, Sonia and North Wales Magazine! Photos are courtesy of David Allen, Nick Eames and Tim Johnson.

Oracle Maquettes in Gold + Cleaning of Spelter Figures

Florence Bigglestone (@floss_art) gilds two maquettes of ‘The Oracle’ with gold finishing: This was inspired by Florence’s recent use of gold foil with ‘Maximus.’

Meanwhile, Nick’s daughter Lucy has been cleaning up the two 19th century Spelter figures – ‘Left Handed Luke’ and ‘Nearly Headless Nick’ – before restoration work on the pair continues.

Restoration of Spelter figures, with Ewan Stell: Part 1

Nick is restoring two mid 19th century Spelter figures for his family, together with his Studio Assistant, Ewan Stell. Given the nature of the damage, we’ve named the two figures ‘Left Handed Luke’ and ‘Nearly Headless Nick.’

To restore these figures, Nick will carry out museum quality repairs, otherwise known as reversible repair. This involves the use of rust proof studding, epoxy resin, putty and adhesives. Not only is there no risk of destroying the original piece, but it is possible to differentiate between the restored sections and the original by X-ray. This method is preferable to welding – which risks destroying large areas of the original piece, and is irreversible (museums generally frown on welding as a method of restoration).

In these photographs, the two figures can be seen in Nick’s studio. Ewan is cleaning the figures before the restoration work begins.

Stay tuned to see the next stage of the restoration process…

‘Roman Remains’ – Completed Piece

The casting of the ‘Maximus’ horse skull with Florence Bigglestone (@floss_art) is now complete, and the piece will soon be displayed within the Grosvenor Museum, Chester – as part of an exhibition drawing inspiration from Roman chariot racing.

Final stage: Once the sculpture has been stained, gold leaf is applied to the raised filligree.

‘Roman Remains’ – Stage 6

The casting of the ‘Maximus’ horse skull with Florence Bigglestone (@floss_art) continues, safely and with social distancing…

Part 1: Using dremels, drills, knives and files, fine detailing is added. The surface of the plaster cast skull is worked, filed, and sanded to a fine finish.

Part 2: The filligree molds are prepared, for the filligree designs to be cast onto the plaster skull.

Part 3: Once cast and set, the filligree designs are then worked over, for a fine finish. Soon, the gold leaf will be added.

Stay tuned for the next part of the process, as ‘Maximus’ nears completion…

‘Roman Remains’ – Stage 5

The casting of the ‘Maximus’ horse skull with Florence Bigglestone (@floss_art) continues, safely and with social distancing…

Part 1: Molds of Florence’s filligree designs are made in latex, and then reinforced with layers of plaster. Casting begins in plaster on the lower jaw mold.

Part 2: Test casts are taken of Florence’s filligree designs, with gold leaf added.

Part 3: Casting of the full skull continues, and the caps start to be joined together.

Part 4: Once the caps have been joined and cast, de-molding begins. Here, Florence can be seen chipping away the scrim that reinforces the joiner’s dogs.

Stay tuned for the next part of the mold making process!

‘Roman Remains’ – Stage 4, Major Update!

The casting of the ‘Maximus’ horse skull with Florence Bigglestone (@floss_art) continues, safely and with social distancing…

Part 1: The final caps of the piece mold for the skull are prepared for a vinamold pour – with the seams filled in with clay, vaseline & white spirit applied, joiner’s dogs fitted, and runners & risers added. The pour then takes place. Once the vinamold has set, de-molding begins.

Part 2: These photographs show how the piece mold has been constructed; in particular how the intricate shapes around the nose have been held in place (to create the needed grooves/hollows in negative). The vinamold caps are brushed down and cleaned, in preparation for test casts to be taken.

Part 3: While test casts are taken from the vinamold caps of the jaw, Florence creates a filligree of her own design, in clay, directly onto the face of the skull itself (which has previously been restored, repaired and reinforced). The filligree design is directly inspired by Roman chariots. Latex will later be used to take molds of the clay filligree.

Part 4: Test casts are taken from the jaw, to test the strength, thickness and finish – the plaster is combined with different types of fibres for each test cast. This process will inform the full cast of the skull. In these images, the test caps seen were cast with jute scrim.

Part 5: Another filligree, of Florence’s design, is created for the sides of the jaw – modelled directly in clay over the bone. Clay walls are then run around the areas on both the face of the skull and the jaw, for molds of the filligree to be taken in latex. After that, the latex is built up in several coats, and then reinforced with cotton scrim.

Stay tuned for the next part of the mold making process!